How much MTB suspension do I need?

Is 160mm travel too much for trail riding?

Generally all-mountain bikes have between 130 and 160mm of travel. … All-mountain bikes have enough suspension to tackle hardcore riding, but are often light and without too much travel for all day epics and some longer pedalling missions.

Is 100mm suspension enough?

Depending on the types of trails you ride (or aspire to ride), there is (hypothetically) an ideal amount of suspension travel for your purposes. … Most modern mountain bikes will have somewhere between 100mm and 170mm of suspension travel.

Is 120mm travel enough for trail?

Honesty, a 120mm fork is enough travel for most Trail riders. Longer travel doesn’t necessarily mean better.

Is 100mm fork travel enough?

A 100mm full suspension 29er is going to be able to shred anything you can throw at it for a long time. That’s a good amount of travel to start with, and on a 29er it’s going to feel like even more while staying efficient. The epic has a really well balanced geometry as well.

How much difference does 20mm of travel make?

As a rough estimate, each 20mm of travel added will correlate to a one-degree difference in the head tube angle.

THIS IS IMPORTANT:  Why do my feet go numb when riding my bike?

Is 150 mm too much travel?

150mm is absolute overkill for every trail in the lower peninsula. Get a downcountry bike instead if you want to go the full suspension route. Or a rowdy hardtail.

Do I need more than 100mm travel?

For basic trail riding I would recommend something closer to 120mm as most 100mm bikes are xc race bikes and likely won’t be as fun on most trails. If you want to do any drops or impacts then 100mm isn’t enough. You’ll bottom out every time.

Can I put a 120mm fork on a 100mm bike?

Yes, it is noticeable but not a disaster. You may have to alter the stem length to compensate but if you want to try it, go for it.

Is 130 mm travel good?

Jayem said: Otherwise, around 120-130mm of travel is a good all-around amount for a variety of riding, including big descents on rides and smaller jumps/drops that are often designed into non-DH-specific trails.

Is 130mm enough for enduro?

For most All-mountain, Cross-country, and Trail riding, you shouldn’t need more travel than 100-130mm. MTB bikes with travel between 140-180mm are intended for intense downhill and enduro-style riding.

Is 150 mm travel enough for enduro?

An enduro bike is basically a mountain bike with at least 150mm of suspension travel. They’re built for the rigours of racing full-bore downhill whilst being sufficiently efficient on climbs and contouring trails too.

Is 40% sag too much?

HOW MUCH SAG SHOULD I RUN? Generally speaking, somewhere between 15% and 40%. Riffle’s preferred starting point is between 25% and 30% for his 160mm to 200mm travel bikes. When he was racing downhill, it was more like 30% to 35%, depending on the bike and the course.

THIS IS IMPORTANT:  Your question: What is the left gear shift on a bike?

Can you jump on a hardtail?

Hardtails are great for jumps. You can boost on the way up. They’re more sensitive to the transition when you land, though. There’s a reason that dirt jump and trials bikes are hardtails and AM and DH bikes are (mostly) full-suspension.

Is 80mm travel enough?

I rode it for 3 rides and came to the conclusion that 80mm isn’t enough. I have to run too much air in it to allow it to be plush. Upping the travel to 90mm made a noticable difference in plushness. If your frame will accomodate, I’d suggest 100mm.