How much suspension should mountain bike have?

Is a mountain bike better with full suspension?

You want a more comfortable ride: A full-suspension mountain bike will soak up most of the jarring bumps that would otherwise be sent to your body (and in some cases, buck you off your bike). This can help reduce fatigue, which in turn can allow you to ride faster, for longer, with greater comfort.

Is 130mm suspension enough?

Registered. Jayem said: Otherwise, around 120-130mm of travel is a good all-around amount for a variety of riding, including big descents on rides and smaller jumps/drops that are often designed into non-DH-specific trails.

Is 80mm fork travel enough?

Registered. Going from 80mm to 100mm fork will change the geometry of the bike–this is a fact not an opinion. This change in geometry will effect handling, making the bike turn slower and more likely to wheelie on a climb, but also making it feel more stable going downhill.

Is 100mm fork travel enough?

A 100mm full suspension 29er is going to be able to shred anything you can throw at it for a long time. That’s a good amount of travel to start with, and on a 29er it’s going to feel like even more while staying efficient. The epic has a really well balanced geometry as well.

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What are hardtails good for?

Hardtails are great for goofing off, hitting jumps, riding some street trials, or just enjoying on the same trails as usual. Hardtails are a little rougher, but that just adds to the sense of speed, even if you’re not riding as fast.

Why are hardtails better?

It will make you smoother – If you don’t learn how to float your bike over roots and rocks, a hardtail will either bounce you off the trail or rattle your teeth out. … Also, due to the lack of rear suspension, bunnyhops are quicker, it’s easier to pick up the front wheel, and the bike is generally lighter and nimbler.

Do I need 160mm travel?

160mm of travel is only really needed if you’re hitting big hucks, or you’re smashing really long bouldery fast descents. Do I need 160mm travel? 99% of the time, no.

Is 120 mm travel enough?

In addition, you’re not likely to notice much difference between a 120mm, 130mm, and 140mm fork. Honesty, a 120mm fork is enough travel for most Trail riders.

Is 130mm enough for Enduro?

For most All-mountain, Cross-country, and Trail riding, you shouldn’t need more travel than 100-130mm. MTB bikes with travel between 140-180mm are intended for intense downhill and enduro-style riding.

Is 150 mm travel too much?

150mm is absolute overkill for every trail in the lower peninsula. Get a downcountry bike instead if you want to go the full suspension route. Or a rowdy hardtail.

Is 140 enough to travel?

Normally trail bikes have up to 140mm of travel. … Less travel means that the bike’s weight is reduced — shorter travel shocks with lighter chassis all keep the weight down. But as soon as you’re getting gnarly or rad the extra squish is essential to keep you in control and from crashing.

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What does 100mm travel mean?

I just wanted to add that mm stands for millimeter (as mentioned by Chain Brain) and the conversion is this: 1 inch equals 25.4 millimeters. This means that a 100mm travel fork will compress roughly 4 inches.

Is 40% sag too much?

HOW MUCH SAG SHOULD I RUN? Generally speaking, somewhere between 15% and 40%. Riffle’s preferred starting point is between 25% and 30% for his 160mm to 200mm travel bikes. When he was racing downhill, it was more like 30% to 35%, depending on the bike and the course.

Can you fit 120mm fork on a 100mm bike?

Yes, it is noticeable but not a disaster. You may have to alter the stem length to compensate but if you want to try it, go for it.

Can you jump on a hardtail?

Hardtails are great for jumps. You can boost on the way up. They’re more sensitive to the transition when you land, though. There’s a reason that dirt jump and trials bikes are hardtails and AM and DH bikes are (mostly) full-suspension.