Can you ride an electric scooter on the road?

Can you drive an electric scooter on the road?

Privately-owned e-scooters, which are widely available to buy online, are illegal to use on public roads, cycle lanes and pavements. The only place a private e-scooter can be used is on private land, with the permission of the landowner.

What happens if you get caught riding an electric scooter?

Met Police said: ‘The riding of e-scooters on London’s roads and pavements remains illegal and potentially dangerous. … Those found riding a private e-scooter could lose six points on their current or future driver’s licence and be fined up to £300.

Can police take my electric scooter?

Currently, there is not a specific law for e-scooters so they are recognised as “powered transporters”, falling under the same laws and regulations as motor vehicles. They are subject to all the same legal requirements – MOT, tax, licensing and specific construction.

Do I need a Licence for an e scooter?

Legal use of electric scooters

The London e-scooter rental scheme is approved by the Department for Transport (DfT): … Riders must be 18 or over and have a full or provisional driving licence to rent an e-scooter. It is still illegal to use privately-owned e-scooters or other powered transporters on public roads.

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How can I legally ride an electric scooter?

You will need a driving license with a category Q entitlement to be allowed to hire an e-scooter in the official trial. This is included in provisional licenses under categories AM, A or B, too. If you only have an international driving license from overseas, you will not be able to ride an e-scooter.

Why are e-scooters illegal?

This is because they are classified as Personal Light Electric Vehicles (PLEVs) and are subject to all the same legal requirements as other motor vehicles.

Are electric scooters getting banned?

E-Scooters are to be banned from London’s Royal Parks, despite pleas from environment campaigners. … Trials began in London in June, but riders have not been allowed to enter the city’s most famous green spaces, including Hyde Park, Green Park, and Kensington Gardens.